PINTURA DIGITAL

Do M a/d nº 1, 2013. Acrylic on canvas. 80 x 120 cm.

Do M a/d nº 1, 2013. Acrylic on canvas. 80 x 120 cm.

Process

Process

Do M a/d nº 2, 2013. Acrylic on canvas. 80 x 120 cm.

Do M a/d nº 2, 2013. Acrylic on canvas. 80 x 120 cm.

Do M a/d nº 2, 2013 (detail).

Do M a/d nº 2, 2013 (detail).

Do M a/d nº 3, 2013. Acrylic on canvas. 160 x 120 cm.

Do M a/d nº 3, 2013. Acrylic on canvas. 160 x 120 cm.

Re M a/d nº 1, 2013. Acrylic on canvas. 80 x 120 cm.

Re M a/d nº 1, 2013. Acrylic on canvas. 80 x 120 cm.


In my series pintura digital (digital painting) I continue my concern for the relationship between time and space according to strategies of repetition. I transform the repetitive rhythmic gestures encountered in the piano practice into explorations of pure abstraction in a different way from the ones previously used in the études series.

On the one hand, I return to the numerical series (números) using a level of superior organization such as musical scales and, on the other hand, I establish a more direct and organic relationship with the artwork, using parts of my body to apply the paint.

The repetitive practice of scales is one of the exercises that every pianist has to go trough during their training. A scale is based on an ordered (ascending or descending) set of notes that can be repeated in different octaves. There are standard fingerings for each scale that represent an organizing way to use the fingers for the different notes/keys. For example, the c major scale: c d e f g a b will involve the fingering 1231234 for the right hand (and vice versa when descending).

My artistic practice is based on the use the repetitive movements of the scales as a way of measuring time and limit space. I am interested in the different variations that inevitably occur in each repetition. I find that these small imperfections have a particular interest. I apply a color to each finger and then I “play” scales on the canvas until I occupy all space in an orderly manner. I proceed by alternating directions from left to right (ascending scale) and right to left (descending scale), and, simultaneously, I say aloud the notes of each scale. The time consumed reflects itself on the footprint of each finger thus the serial repetition of colors creates a visual rhythm. I continue by using the same process in different layers, which function as strata, becoming a new way of showing traces of the passage of time.

Comments are closed